HUGE CNN HEADLINE: Donald Trump in 2006: I ‘sort of hope’ real estate market tanks

In 2006, Trump cheered on a housing market crash saying, “I sort of hope that happens because then people like me would go in and buy. … If there is a bubble burst, as they call it, you know you can make a lot of money.”

Last night, Elizabeth Warren gave a speech that is going viral — slamming Trump for being a “small, insecure money grubber” who is in the pocket of Wall Street and looking to con the American people.

Show your support for Elizabeth Warren and help her 2018 election.

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To top it off, many major outlets are buzzing about the role Elizabeth Warren will play in unifying the Democratic Party in the months to come. Take a look:

REAL CLEAR POLITICS: Sen. Warren Seen as Key Figure in Uniting Dems

As the Democratic primary heads toward a predictable but potentially acrimonious conclusion, questions abound about how the party can unite and invigorate itself. One solution often mentioned by party operatives hoping to quickly heal: Elizabeth Warren.

The Massachusetts senator is likely to be an integral figure in rallying the troops around the Democratic ticket, whether she is a part of it or not.

Warren’s potential was on full display Tuesday night, when she used a speech at a Washington gala to excoriate Donald Trump, calling him “a small, insecure money grubber.” Earlier in the day on Capitol Hill, Warren launched a new coalition of lawmakers and union leaders designed to “take on Wall Street.”

Warren has built a national profile on progressive issues that have been at the heart of the party’s primary between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders; she has a particular resonance with Democrats on rhetoric and policy that is distinct from both presidential candidates.

Plus more:

Progressive activists view Warren as an indispensable part of the unification process and would like to see her have significant influence in the campaign in terms of policy and positions. Adam Green of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee expects Warren to want a say in executive branch appointments, an issue about which she cares deeply, and about what types of people will be brought into a new administration.

“The more that it’s clear that progressive economic thinkers … will be considered for top positions, the more full-throated and authentic it will allow her to be in campaigning for eventual nominee,” says Green, suggesting Warren could be asked to co-chair a presidential transition committee.